The City at Night

One of the things our photography tutor often says is that we should always have a camera with us, even if it is just the one on our phone.  That makes a lot of sense; you never know when you are going to stumble across a photo-worthy moment or scene.  But I have to confess that I tend not to lug my camera around with me – I would feel strange taking it to work or to the grocery store – and my phone is not particularly smart, so I have sometimes missed an opportunity.  Night time photography was definitely not on the agenda yesterday and I was quite unprepared (no tripod yet again!) but did at least have my camera with me.  I knew the images might suffer from camera shake because of the low shutter speed, and that they were likely to be grainy because I had to push the ISO up to the max (1600 on my camera) but I couldn’t resist having a go.

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The red buses and phone boxes tell you instantly that the photos were taken in London, on the walk from Covent Garden to Embankment station, via Trafalgar Square.  It was early evening and there was still some residual natural light.  I loved the colours reflected by the wet pavements and the silhouetted figures with their long shadows.

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These photos were taken in Trafalgar Square, with Admiralty Arch in the background.  The Square was full of activity; street entertainers were still working, though the ‘hugs for free’ group had gone home, and there were people with cameras wherever you looked.  It wasn’t difficult to blend in!  The photos are perhaps a touch too dark, but I didn’t want to alter the exposure too much in post-processing

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No introduction needed.  I had a great view of the London Eye from the other side of the river and then spotted Big Ben.

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My new favourite!  The moon was beautiful and this view, with the lit dome of St. Paul’s, was a photo opportunity that couldn’t be ignored!  I would have preferred a slightly faster shutter speed, to reduce the blurriness of the bus, but like the sense of movement this gives.

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